Announcements

Footprint 32: Rethinking the Architecture of Dwelling in the Digital Age

2021-10-05

The Call for Contributions for Footprint 32 is out now. 

Nelson Mota and Dirk van den Heuvel will be the editors of this issue, dedicated to ‘Rethinking the Architecture of Dwelling in the Digital Age.’ In this issue of Footprint we aim to rethink the architecture of dwelling in the digital age, taking into account the current attributes of the everlasting housing crisis, the realities of global economies, the disruptive techno-infrastructure supporting it, and the profoundly ecological precarity of contemporary housing policies influencing dwelling practices worldwide. This issue welcomes contributions that address localised practices and examples, combining theoretical reflection and speculation with design positions. Proposals for full articles (6000–8000 words) and review articles (2000–4000 words) will be evaluated by the editors in the form of abstracts (max. 1000 words for full articles, max. 500 words for review articles) submitted by 3 December 2021. Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to develop their contributions by 6 March 2022.

Full articles will go through a double-blind peer review process, while review articles will be evaluated by the editors. Footprint 32 will be published in the Spring of 2023.

Read more about Footprint 32: Rethinking the Architecture of Dwelling in the Digital Age

Current Issue

Vol. 15 No. 1 (2021): Issue # 28 | Spring/ Summer 2021 | All is in Formation: Architecture, Cybernetics, Ecology
					View Vol. 15 No. 1 (2021): Issue # 28 | Spring/ Summer 2021 | All is in Formation: Architecture, Cybernetics, Ecology

Footprint #28 examines the relation between cybernetics and architecture by focusing on a problem they both share: the production, consumption and flow of information, or, in other terms, of meaning. Therefore, cyberneticisation can set the foundations for a relational account that examines how signs are communicated and how meaning is produced and experienced within systems. This third-order cybernetics extends beyond the original scope of living organisms and their environments in order to include ecologies of ideas, power, institutions, media and so on. In this sense, cyberneticisation is radically environmental, positing the primacy of relations over fixed terms, binary oppositions and linear logics, making it high time for architectural and urban studies to take into consideration its ground-breaking potentials.

Issue's editors: Stavros Kousoulas and Dulmini Perera

Published: 2021-06-29

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