Announcements

Footprint 33: Situating More-Than-Human Ecologies of Extended Urbanisation

2022-02-21

Víctor Muñoz Sanz and Nikos Katsikis are editing Footprint 33, dedicated to ‘Situating More-Than-Human Ecologies of Extended Urbanisation’.

This issue of Footprint aims to explore the spatial implications of technological transformations found across those operational landscapes of primary production (agriculture, resource extraction) that constitute the metabolic basis of urbanisation. We welcome contributions around three sub-themes focusing on: (1) multiscalar processes of operationalisation, producing landscapes of extended urbanisation, with a focus on primary production and circulation; (2) situated entanglements of technology, questioning assemblages of human and more-than-human work with particular landscapes and architectures; (3) design investigations of automated landscapes of extended urbanisation, deciphering their physical and material configurations.

Proposals for full, peer-reviewed articles (6000–8000 words) and review articles and visual essays (2000–4000 words) will be evaluated by the editors in the form of abstracts (max. 1000 words for full articles, max. 500 words for review articles and visual essays) submitted by 22 April 2022. Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to develop their contributions by 2 September 2022.

Full articles go through a double-blind peer review process, while review articles are evaluated by the editors. Footprint 33 will be published in the autumn of 2023.

Read more about Footprint 33: Situating More-Than-Human Ecologies of Extended Urbanisation

Current Issue

Vol. 15 No. 1 (2021): Issue # 28 | Spring/ Summer 2021 | All is in Formation: Architecture, Cybernetics, Ecology
					View Vol. 15 No. 1 (2021): Issue # 28 | Spring/ Summer 2021 | All is in Formation: Architecture, Cybernetics, Ecology

Footprint #28 examines the relation between cybernetics and architecture by focusing on a problem they both share: the production, consumption and flow of information, or, in other terms, of meaning. Therefore, cyberneticisation can set the foundations for a relational account that examines how signs are communicated and how meaning is produced and experienced within systems. This third-order cybernetics extends beyond the original scope of living organisms and their environments in order to include ecologies of ideas, power, institutions, media and so on. In this sense, cyberneticisation is radically environmental, positing the primacy of relations over fixed terms, binary oppositions and linear logics, making it high time for architectural and urban studies to take into consideration its ground-breaking potentials.

Issue's editors: Stavros Kousoulas and Dulmini Perera

Published: 2021-06-29

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